How to Acknowledge Grant Funding in Papers and Presentations

Which grants to acknowledge

  • If you are a CDE affiliate, include the NICHD R24 grant number
  • If you are a CDHA affiliate and the work is aging-related, include the NIA P30 grant number
  • If you were supported as a trainee, include the appropriate training grant (NIA T32, NICHD T32, or Fogarty)
  • The relevant research grant, where appropriate (usually R01 or R03)
  • If you wish to spell out NICHD in your acknowledgments, note that the full name is the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development
Note: all 0s in grant numbers are zeros, not the letter O, including R01 and R03.

Important Grant Numbers

Center for Demography and Ecology: R24 HD047873

Center for Demography of Health and Aging: P30 AG17266

NICHD Training Grant (Demography and Ecology): T32 HD07014

NIA Training Grant (Population, Life Course and Aging): T32 AG00129

Fogarty Training Grant (International Training in Population Health): D43 TW01586

Wisconsin Longitudinal Study: Tracking the Life Course (WLS P01): P01AG021079

Example Acknowledgments

Example 1:

This research was supported by National Institute on Aging grant R01 AG0123456, and by core grants to the Center for Demography and Ecology at the University of Wisconsin-Madison (R24 HD047873) and to the Center for Demography of Health and Aging at the University of Wisconsin-Madison (P30 AG017266).

Example 2:

The authors gratefully acknowledge use of the facilities of the Center for Demography of Health and Aging at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, funded by NIA Center Grant P30 AG017266.

Example 3:

This research received support from the grant T32 HD007014, awarded to the Center for Demography and Ecology at the University of Wisconsin-Madison by the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development.

Citation for use of WLS materials and protocol for collection of DNA

Materials and protocols used in the collection of DNA are based on those developed by the Wisconsin Longitudinal Study (WLS) and the University of Wisconsin Survey Center at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. The WLS is supported in part by National Institute on Aging grants P01AG021079 and R01AG09775 to Robert M. Hauser and by core grants to the Center for Demography and Ecology at the University of Wisconsin-Madison (R24 HD047873) and to the Center for Demography of Health and Aging at the University of Wisconsin-Madison (P30 AG017266).